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The meter the this city is straightforward. Wheatley to write in iambic pentameter, and her poem is an octave, or set of 4 couplets. The eight present rhyme in aabbaabb fashion. In this way, she adheres to famous poetic conventions. 

In various other ways, however, this poem is not traditional at all....




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The meter the this poem is straightforward. Wheatley to write in iambic pentameter, and her poem is an octave, or set of 4 couplets. The eight currently rhyme in aabbaabb fashion. In this way, she adheres to renowned poetic conventions. 

In various other ways, however, this city is not traditional at all. To start with, the poet it s her is one interesting instance of a literate slave writing about her very own experience prior to the nineteenth century, wherein we start to see an ext of this. The template of the city is twofold, and also in some sense problematic to the contemporary eye. Wheatley explains her indigenous Africa together a "Pagan" floor wherein her soul was "benighted": she defines her enslavement and passage to America as representing a salvation for her, in that she has actually been taught about God and also a Saviour and also redemption she "never sought nor knew" before. 

The second fifty percent of the octave is an exhortation to believer to acknowledge the "sable race" as equally capable of afford redemption—the poet knows that some view the shade as "a diabolic die," noting out "Negros" together "black as Cain." The language evokes Biblical numbers of villainy, specific Cain and also Satan, together Wheatley knows that, to many, her soul shows up as "benighted" as her dark skin. 

Wheatley"s themes, then, that blackness and of redemption, are entwined, however she additionally seeks to disentangle them in the eyes of the whites who may fulfill her. Blackness the the skin, Wheatley says, does not equate to blackness of the soul, and also black world too may "join th"angelic train".