Andrew Alden is a geologist based in Oakland, California. He functions as a research overview for the U.S. Geological Survey.

You are watching: What does the acid test tell you about a mineral


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Andrew Alden

The mineral is put in acid. Calcite bubbles easily in cold acid. This is not calcite.

The most common white mineral in the calcite group react in different ways to cold and hot acid, together follows:

Calcite (CaCO3): bubbles strongly in cold acidMagnesite (MgCO3): bubbles just in hot acidSiderite (FeCO3): bubbles only in hot acidSmithsonite (ZnCO3): bubbles just in hot acid

Calcite is by far the most usual in the calcite group, and also is the just one that frequently looks favor our specimen. However, we understand it isn't calcite. Sometimes magnesite occurs in white granular masses like our specimen, yet the key suspect is dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2), i beg your pardon is no in the calcite family. It bubbles weakly in cold acid, strongly in hot acid. Due to the fact that we're using weak vinegar, we will pulverize the specimen to make the reaction faster.


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Crushed carbonate Mineral


Andrew Alden

The an enig mineral is ground in a hand mortar. The well-formed rhombs room a sure authorize of a lead carbonate mineral.

See more: Which Of The Following Is The Means-Extremes Product Property Of Proportions?


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Dolomite in Acetic acid


Andrew Alden

Powdered dolomite bubbles tenderness in cold hydrochloric acid and also in warm vinegar. Hydrochloric acid is much preferred since the reaction through dolomite is otherwise very slow.